Maryland LCV Organizes Community Art Activation calling for Climate Action Now at the National Aquarium in Baltimore

September 9, 2021

Maryland LCV Organizes Community Art Activation calling for Climate Action Now at the National Aquarium in Baltimore

Baltimore, MD —  Thursday morning, Maryland LCV teamed up with local artist Michael Kirby in front of the National Aquarium to participate in a community art project connecting Maryland’s urgent need to address the threats of the climate crisis in the state with the stories of the people and the communities who are impacted by the climate crisis.

With the latest IPCC climate report citing a “code red for humanity,” communities are mobilizing to demand action at the scale that science and justice demands. Maryland alone experienced 31 extreme weather events in the past 10 years, costing the state up to $10 billion in damages. Today’s art activation is just another way people are coming together across the country to call for bold climate infrastructure investments that deliver clean energy, jobs and justice.

“Just last week, Hurricane Ida made landfall over 1,000 miles away and wreaked havoc in its path- damaging our communities and fragile ecosystems. These storms and extreme weather events are just increasing in size and frequency because of climate change. It’s time for action,” said Laura Bankey, vice president of National Aquarium’s Conservation Programs.

“We have a once-in-a-lifetime chance to ‘Build Back Better,’ to create a clean energy economy that works for everyone and lifts up frontline and disadvantaged communities. Our elected leaders need to hear that we are calling for climate action now,” said Kim Coble, executive director of Maryland League of Conservation Voters.

A representative from Senator Van Hollen’s office, Shannon Sneed stopped by along with Governor Hogan, who was on his way to another event.

Photos of the event can be found here: https://www.facebook.com/mdlcv/posts/10157921356411174

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Maryland LCV is known for educating lawmakers and holding them accountable for their leadership and votes on key environmental issues. Their annual scorecard, along with other reports, help inform voters about their legislators’ records.