About Dannielle Lipinski

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far Dannielle Lipinski has created 170 blog entries.

Statement on Frederick County’s Introduction of a Strong Forest Bill

IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 14, 2020

Contact:

Dannielle Lipinski, dlipinski@mdlcv.org, 443-617-7257

TOP STATEWIDE ENVIRONMENTAL GROUP APPLAUDS FREDERICK COUNTY FOR INTRODUCING STRONG FOREST PROTECTION BILL

Frederick, MD – Maryland League of Conservation Voters joins environmental partners Preservation Maryland, Chesapeake Bay Foundation, Sierra Club, Clean Water Action,  Frederick County Councilmember Kai Hagen and Frederick County Executive Jan Gardner for introducing the Frederick County Forest Resource Ordinance (FRO). This bill will protect forests in Frederick County by creating a true no net loss program in Frederick County.

“We are grateful to County Executive Gardner and Councilmember Hagen for introducing a bill, if passed, will create the strongest County level forest conservation program in the state.” said Kim Coble, Executive Director at Maryland LCV.

“Years ago, Frederick County had a strong Forest Resource Ordinance that was repealed. We now see forests being lost to rampant overdevelopment that can be successfully curtailed with this bill,” said Ben Alexandro, Water Policy Director at the Maryland League of Conservation Voters. 

The benefits of forests are immeasurable. They filter our waters, increase property values, reduce energy costs, provide clean air and wildlife habitat, improve public health, and are a critical solution in the fight against the climate crisis. 

###

Maryland LCV is known for educating lawmakers and holding them accountable for their leadership and votes on key environmental issues. Their annual scorecard, along with other reports, help inform voters about their legislators’ records.  

30 West Street Suite C Annapolis, MD 21401 410-280-9855

www.mdlcv.org 

By |2020-02-14T12:16:12-05:00February 14th, 2020|Categories: Press|Tags: , , , , |0 Comments

Where you’ll find the lobbyists in Annapolis

By Kristen Harbeson, resident Lobbyist and Political Director

I love tracking my steps during session – wondering how many miles I logged in a day.  Although there are days when my feet ache from all the walking, there is at least as much sitting as there is walking: sitting in committee rooms (and occasionally on the floor outside of committee rooms); sitting around tables during coalition meetings and while talking to legislators; sitting in the public lounges for emergency conversations with colleagues.

One of the most likely places you’ll find me during much of the Session is in a wingback chair in the hallway on the second floor of the House Office Building.  From there, I can talk to Delegates and their staff pass by on their way to and from the Environment and Transportation and Economic Matters Committees.  I’m not the only one who tends to find herself there – it’s a spot where lobbyists from every kind of advocacy group will find a place to take a call, charge their phones, or catch a few minutes on their laptops between meetings.

These kinds of relaxed locations are where conversations happen that build community, and sometimes provide news in bits and pieces that, when taken together, can help provide context to help shape a legislative strategy.

Ramon Palencia-Calvo, our Deputy Director testifies for one of our priority pieces of legislation.

Ramon Palencia-Calvo, our Deputy Director testifies for one of our priority pieces of legislation.

This week there was a hearing on our first priority bill.  Ramon testified on the importance of fully funding the Maryland Transit Authority, which has a $2 billion shortfall over the next ten years according to a study released last summer. The MTA serves every jurisdiction in the state, but low-income and already disadvantaged communities suffer the most from failures due to inadequate maintenance. Additionally, a strong, affordable, and accessible public transportation system is essential to reducing Maryland’s greenhouse gas pollution. (Did you know that the transportation sector – especially highway traffic – represents more than 40% of our greenhouse gasses?!) This is always an important moment in a campaign.  It’s the first time that arguments for and against are presented side by side, and examined by the committees who make the decision of what happens next. It’s a little bit like a play, and a little bit like a polite boxing match.

In this case, the hearing was in front of the House Appropriations Committee which works with the State Budget.  Ramon, and all of our partners provided strong testimony after the bill was presented by Delegate Lierman.  The Department of Transportation spoke against the bill, which isn’t uncommon, especially for bills that require the Governor to spend money in a specific way. Next week, the same bill will be heard in the Senate, and then we work on the next step: A vote from subcommittee.

Sitting or standing, or running through the halls, you can count on your Maryland LCV staff working hard next week to pass strong environmental laws.  Next week we’ll have some marathon bill hearings, too, so stay tuned!

Talk about changing the body politic!

By Kristen Harbeson, Political Director

Folk singer Pete Seeger, one of my great heroes, once said that “when you bring people together, even if just for a beer, you’re changing the body politic.” He knew what he was talking about. Pete’s music was an important part of the soundtrack for social change in the 20th century, especially for both labor rights and the environment.

Kristen Harbeson speaks at the 2020 MDEnviroSummit

Bringing people together, and changing the body politic, is a pivotal part of the work of your Maryland LCV staff and our partners. On any given week, Maryland LCV staff participate in as many as 15-20 different conference calls or coalition meetings relating to our priorities and how we all can work together to advance our agenda.  These are in addition to the dozens of other conversations, in groups of two and three and four, which propel us forward in the session dance.  Periodically there are public meetings like the one that Dannielle and I went to on off-shore wind in Ocean City (and that Dannielle wrote about).

By far the best demonstration of bringing people together to change the body politic, though, happened this week during the annual Environmental Summit when 30 organizations that make up the Citizen’s Campaign for the Environment (CCE) gather together with hundreds of advocates to unveil and showcase the bills we selected as our priorities. For the last two years, I’ve had the joy of being able to – as the chairman of CCE – welcome everyone to the event and kick off the program.  There is simply nothing like standing in front of a room of five hundred advocates ready to charge forward and make a difference.  It’s a tremendous honor to be able to help coordinate the extraordinary table of environmental leaders that do so much amazing work during the ninety-day session and beyond.

But that’s not what I will remember most as we move through the next 68 days of Session.  What I will remember are the words of the 18-year old keynote speaker, Athena Verghis, who left the packed room with the following words:

“We stand here convinced of a bright future for Maryland, because when we change the root, we can change the crop. Let us replace the root of ignorance with much needed understanding and unwavering commitment to the future.  Let us replace frustration with hope. As global citizens for tomorrow I want to leave with one message: There is not enough time for us to point fingers and promise short-term gain that will only benefit a few citizens. However there is just enough time to recognize the urgency of this climate emergency. For every single individual in this room to fulfill his or her role as legislative leaders or social influencers and to commit and create systemic change that benefits all living things that call Maryland their home. Because this is your backyard as well as our future.”

I, and every person walking out of that room, left with a renewed sense of hope and urgency, committed to doing everything we could to move our state forward. Talk about changing the body politic! Pete Seeger would have been proud.

Circles within circles

Weekly Counter

The weekly counter of our Political Director

By Kristen Harbeson, Political Director

There are a lot of analogies to describe Annapolis during the legislative session. One of my favorites is thinking of it as a dance: spinning, and turning, passing hand to hand; dozens of interactions, sometimes brief and sometimes lengthy, that ultimately creates a community. Circles within circles, everyone relentlessly moving through the steps of the dance that does not end until Sine Die, the last day of session. 

I was reminded of the nature of the community last week. When an emergency took me away from Session immediately after it began, the legislative work didn’t miss a beat. The Maryland LCV family and our coalition partners all stepped in to make sure that, while I took care of urgent family business, none of the important work we do together suffered: the dance continued. 

Coming back on Monday I was able to jump right back into the circle, only slightly disoriented with having missed a few rounds of the routine. The community is also extremely caring: While we all have our roles – legislator, aide, and advocate – we all are people first, and the human connections can be both strong and affirming. It’s one of the many reasons I love this job and this world. 

This week’s work was visiting legislative offices with the “blue backs” (in the House) and “white backs” (in the Senate) of our priority bills. These are literally copies of the bills, where legislators can sign their names as cosponsors before the bills are introduced.

 Asking for cosponsors helps us to determine the level of support for a particular bill (signing on as a co-sponsor is a strong commitment of support), and an opportunity to answer the questions that legislators and their staffs may have on our bills. Walking into their offices also, sometimes, gives the legislators a chance to say “hey! I wanted to talk to you about this other bill I’m thinking about. Do you have a minute?” 

Last week we were walking around two priority bills: the Plastic Bag ban and the ban on Chlorpyrifos – which I will talk more about in the weeks to come. Both of these are just about ready to move to their next step – being “read out” on the floor and assigned to a committee for a hearing date. We’ll be doing the same process next week with other bills, as the steps of the dance become ever more complicated (and interesting!).

Statement from Kim Coble, Executive Director Maryland LCV

January 9, 2020
Immediate Release

Press Contact: Dannielle Lipinski, Maryland LCV
dlipinski@mdlcv.org, 443-617-7257

Statement from Kim Coble, Executive Director Maryland League of Conservation Voters in Response to:
Governor Hogan’s intentions to take legal action against EPA and Pennsylvania regarding the Chesapeake Bay Clean Up Plan.

The Maryland League of Conservation Voters applauds Governor Hogan and Attorney General Frosh for prioritizing the clean-up of the Chesapeake Bay. Their pursuit of legal actions is crucial to ensure that the Chesapeake Bay Clean Up Plan is implemented and a clean Chesapeake Bay is achieved. If EPA continues to abdicate its responsibility to restore the Chesapeake, Marylanders need to know that our elected leaders will respond appropriately.

Additionally, we urge the Hogan Administration to prioritize clean water by fully funding state agencies that work to implement the plan, taking meaningful action to protect the oyster population, and implementing aggressive greenhouse gas reduction initiatives.

Maryland LCV holds elected officials, including the Governor, accountable to ensure they reflect the strong conservation values of Maryland citizens.

# # #

Maryland League of Conservation Voters (Maryland LCV) is a state-wide nonpartisan organization that uses political action and education to protect our air, land, public health, and water. Maryland LCV endorses and elects pro-conservation candidates and holds elected officials accountable through legislative scorecards. A leading legislative watchdog in Annapolis, we have advocated for smart environmental policies for 40 years, working to make Maryland a healthy and prosperous place for families and communities. Maryland LCV protects public health by fighting for restoration of the Chesapeake Bay and local waters, preserving green spaces, promoting smarter growth and increasing Maryland’s investment in clean energy.

By |2020-01-13T23:35:39-05:00January 9th, 2020|Categories: Blog, Press|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

It’s the Best Day of the Year- the beginning of Session!

Kristen Harbeson, Political Director

By Kristen Harbeson, Political Director

I always get a charge out of the first day of Session.  There is a “back to school” feel to the campus, as everyone returns to the halls of Annapolis with big dreams and freshly minted New Year Resolutions.  Many legislators are returning with new committee assignments or leadership appointments, so they will be finding their way to new offices and learning the ropes of new policy briefs. Six new members (five in the House of Delegates and one in the Senate) – will be moving into their offices for the first time, and both the House and Senate will have new faces behind the rostrum, gaveling their chambers to order. And, of course, there are changes in the environmental community, with new leadership in many partner organizations – including our own!

The energy around a new session is electric – but it is only a matter of hours after the rush of greetings before everyone buckles down for work. I look at my newly polished shoes and know that at the end of 90-days, they will have traversed miles and climbed mountains (all within the same ¼ mile and three buildings), in the interest of pursuing strong environmental policy. The notebook where I keep a record of meetings and conversations, currently crisp and empty, will be full. I will be a stranger to the desk in my office, in favor of the floors outside of the committee rooms.

Over the next 90-days, I’ll be updating you weekly on the stories from the halls of Annapolis, and giving you a look behind the scenes at my life as a lobbyist for “The Political Voice of the Environment,” and help to pull back the curtain of how bills become laws here in Maryland.  I hope you’ll take this as an opportunity to ask questions as we go along, and as we work together to pass ground-breaking environmental legislation. Don’t forget to sign up to receive our weekly “hotlist” of legislation we’re tracking (or you can find it here: https://www.mdlcv.org/weekly-hotlist).  I can’t wait to hear from you!

Thinking of Running for Office? LCV can help!

We’re partnering with LCV national and re:power to train people to run in down-ballot races across the United States. Are you up for the challenge? 

2020 could be the year you run for office — and we want to help. 

For the first time in its history, LCV is holding a non-partisan Candidate Academy to teach the ins and outs of running for office. 

This exclusive program, in partnership with re:power, will give diverse environmental leaders who are passionate about their communities the tools they need to run — and win. 

We all succeed when individuals who are passionate about the environment and addressing climate change take the leap and run for office.  If that sounds like you, then we want you to apply today! 

Apply to be a part of LCV’s first-ever Candidate Academy >>

The deadline to apply is January 10, 2020. The training will take place in February and March in Seattle. Space is extremely limited, so apply today! If you are selected, we will be in touch with you soon on next steps. 

For questions, contact Shanthi Gonzales at LCV (sgonzales@lcv.org)

By |2020-01-07T17:37:01-05:00January 7th, 2020|Categories: Blog|Tags: , |Comments Off on Thinking of Running for Office? LCV can help!

Statement from Kim Coble, Executive Director, Maryland LCV

January 3, 2020

Immediate Release

Press Contact: Dannielle Lipinski, dlipinski@mdlcv.org, 443-617-7257

Statement from Kim Coble, Executive Director, Maryland League of Conservation Voters in response to:

Environmental Protection Agency’s comment at today’s Chesapeake Bay Commission meeting that the Chesapeake Bay TMDL (the Bay clean up plan) is an “aspirational document” not a regulatory document. 

“This is a profoundly sad and disappointing moment in Bay history. After decades of leadership on Bay clean up efforts, we are watching the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) turn its back and walk away from the Chesapeake Bay. EPA is abdicating its role and responsibility by treating the Bay clean up plan as an ‘aspirational document’ and not as the effective model it has been recognized as and proved to be. Maryland LCV is calling on Governor Hogan, as the Chair of the Chesapeake Bay Executive Council, to coordinate an immediate and robust response to EPA’s abdication of its responsibility.”

Under the current clean up plan, Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania must develop and fully implement their pollution reduction plans by 2025. This would ensure the ultimate removal of the Chesapeake Bay from the list of dirty waters (the 303d list) https://www.epa.gov/tmdl/overview-listing-impaired-waters-under-cwa-section-303d. The state clean up plans, collectively known as the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load, have been touted as the most effective and successful environmental clean up effort in the country.

# # #

Maryland League of Conservation Voters (Maryland LCV) is a state-wide nonpartisan organization that uses political action and education to protect our air, land, public health, and water. Maryland LCV endorses and elects pro-conservation candidates and holds elected officials accountable through legislative scorecards. A leading legislative watchdog in Annapolis, we have advocated for smart environmental policies for 40 years, working to make Maryland a healthy and prosperous place for families and communities. Maryland LCV protects public health by fighting for restoration of the Chesapeake Bay and local waters, preserving green spaces, promoting smarter growth and increasing Maryland’s investment in clean energy.

 

www.mdlcv.org

By |2020-01-14T00:11:28-05:00January 3rd, 2020|Categories: Blog, Press|0 Comments

Anne Arundel County Chapter Fundraiser at the Home of Beth Garraway

Anne Arundel County Chapter Fundraiser at the Home of Beth Garraway

Anne Arundel County Chapter has endorsed the following candidates in the Annapolis city elections:
 
Michael Pantelides- Mayor
Kurt Riegel – Ward 2 

Marc Rodriguez – Ward 5
Shaneka Henson – Ward 6
Rob Savidge – Ward 7
Ross Arnett – Ward 8
 

Tuesday, August 15, 2017
6 PM- 8 PM

Home of Beth Garraway
904 Creek Drive
Annapolis, MD 21403

 

Contact Information
Ticket & Guest Information
Ticket Level Quantity
TOTAL: $0 QTY: 0

To Pay by check, please address to Maryland LCV and mail to Maryland LCV, 30 West Street Suite C, Annapolis, MD 21401

With your support, Maryland LCV is able to continue our work to hold elected officials accountable and protect our environment for future generations.

Because your contribution supports our effective legislative and political action, it is not tax deductible.

A copy of the current financial statement of the Maryland League of Conservation Voters is available by writing Maryland LCV, 30 West Street Suite C, Annapolis MD 21401 or by calling (410) 280-9855. Documents and information submitted under the Maryland Solicitations Act are also available, for the cost of postage and copies, from the Maryland Secretary of State, State House, Annapolis MD 21401, (410) 974-5534.

By |2019-11-23T06:17:15-05:00November 22nd, 2019|Categories: Form|Comments Off on Anne Arundel County Chapter Fundraiser at the Home of Beth Garraway